Aiming for novelty in coronavirus coverage, journalists end up sensationalizing the trivial and untrue

For centuries, what has made news valuable and news organizations profitable has been the speed at which journalists collect and disseminate information.
This is useful for both commerce and public service. But the rush for novelty can prioritize sensationalism over depth, and elevate the newest tidbit of information over more important reporting.
When novelty replaces context, the ironic result is a less-informed but more up-to-date public.

JUDITH Y. KIM

JUDITH Y. KIM EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Place of Origin: Glendale, CA     Judith Kim is a hard-nosed journalist with an appetite for the difficult, no matter how controversial. She always has at least 35 tabs open on her Mac, which range from deep TED talks to exposés on the 1st amendment. Read more…