Are you in an Echo Chamber?

When you’re online, do you feel like everyone is constantly on the same understanding on a variety of topics where the crazy, fringe ideas couldn’t possibly appeal to a substantial portion of people? Are all your ads, news articles and timelines often mirroring your political opinions? If so, then you could be in a digital echo chamber.

Aiming for novelty in coronavirus coverage, journalists end up sensationalizing the trivial and untrue

For centuries, what has made news valuable and news organizations profitable has been the speed at which journalists collect and disseminate information.
This is useful for both commerce and public service. But the rush for novelty can prioritize sensationalism over depth, and elevate the newest tidbit of information over more important reporting.
When novelty replaces context, the ironic result is a less-informed but more up-to-date public.