Activism in the age of social media

Activism in the Age of Social Media Amanda Funger | Avant-Youth Due to the pandemic, many people are becoming involved with social justice movements through social media, which has become an increasingly popular avenue where a lot of people engage in activism. A Pew Research Center survey found that about Read more…

Cancel Culture Is Toxic

“Twitter, do your thing,” is a toxic line used to expose someone, a brand or company that is displaying problematic behavior.
It is the epitome of cancel culture, the idea that someone can be cancelled based on their unsettling remarks or ideologies. Although the term “cancel culture” is new, the act behind it is not. The trend is particularly popular amongst Gen Z’ers and Millennials.

Twitter hack exposes broader threat to democracy and society

In case 2020 wasn’t dystopian enough, hackers on July 15 hijacked the Twitter accounts of former President Barack Obama, presidential hopeful Joe Biden, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Kim Kardashian and Apple, among others. Each hijacked account posted a similar fake message. The high-profile individual or company wanted to philanthropically give back to the community during COVID-19 and would double any donations made to a bitcoin wallet, identical messages said. The donations followed.
The hack on the surface may appear to be a run-of-the-mill financial scam. But the breach has chilling implications for democracy.

Disinformation campaigns are murky blends of truth, lies and sincere beliefs – lessons from the pandemic

As a researcher who studies how communications technologies are used during crises, I’ve found that this mix of information types makes it difficult for people, including those who build and run online platforms, to distinguish an organic rumor from an organized disinformation campaign. And this challenge is not getting any easier as efforts to understand and respond to COVID-19 get caught up in the political machinations of this year’s presidential election.

Biases in algorithms hurt those looking for information on health

Several public health agencies, such as state health departments, have invested resources in YouTube as a channel for health communication. Patients with chronic health conditions especially rely on social media, including YouTube videos, to learn more about how to manage their conditions.
But video recommendations on such sites could exacerbate preexisting disparities in health.